The first pieces I made.  A bit of an ambitious work being made using many moulds and many assembled pieces.  The work was entitled “just a Teapot” or “jester Teapot”.  I think I may have called to both at times but it was a play on words.  It is probably important to identify where the imagery and the technique came from as it did strongly influence my work and others.


The imagery came from a range of sources, from ceramics magazines to contemporary exhibition scene in New Zealand, notably the Flecture Challenge Ceramics Awards. However the one thing I remember most from the time or before this time was an exhibition on Richard Marquis at the Auckland Museum circa 1985.  The influence came from the way glass was used and the way the work was assembled from multiple parts.


Of course imagery and technique are very much linked and the technique owed a lot to a range of sources. By far the biggest influence was my partner Susan Newby who supplied most the technical information to make this work.  Sue had a background working with ceramics and at the time was working for a Lladro type, ceramic figurine casting company in New Lynn.  I vividly remember the cast room she worked in. There I saw a way of casting and assembling hollow multi piece structures that enabled me to make this work.  After seeing these techniques, many which are quite unique to this form of production, I designed and made the original variation on the teapot above. 

The original model was made of clay in the bedroom of my flat in Kingsland in 1985/86 and the teapot was fired in a rented kiln. 

The outside of Out of the Blue - Workshops a retail space in Kingsland.    The design of the ‘signage was a derived from a part of the Jester tea-pot.

Jester Tea-pot.  1986 to 1998

Lladro multi piece casting

Ceramic design by

BRUCE HALIDAY

WORK

1986 - 1988

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Jester Teapot.


Material and process: This teapot is one of the first slip cast objects I ever made. It has three main sections, the lid, the teapot and the base. It is made up of over twenty pieces and was hand decorated with under-glaze colour.

Numbers produced: I made about six of these, all assembled and decorated differently. This is a later version from about 1987/88 but the first were made in 1986.

Comment: This teapot was a major influence in the development of work using this technique. The slip casting and assembling of knobs and appendages was partly influenced by visiting a ceramic ornamental figurine factory.

In 1995 it was four yellow five foot versions of these appendages (blue on the teapot pictured) that became "signage" on the outside of "Out of the Blue Workshops". A studio, retail and gallery space which I co-owned in Kingsland, Auckland, between 1995 -1998.

retrospective designs

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Glass work of Richard Marquis